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What should you consider while making your parenting plan?

You and your current spouse agree to divorce, but you have shared children to consider. What should you do to create a parenting plan that supports your children?

Psychology Today explores the nuances and considerations that go into drafting a parenting plan. Understand how to cover all your bases and support your child’s post-divorce life.

Make the plan sooner rather than later

You likely have a lot on your plate with your divorce, but try to prioritize your parenting plan. Assembling the plan now means providing your shared kids with stability during a time of uncertainty.

Communicate your concerns

If you have hesitations or concerns while making your parenting plan, figure out a way to voice them to the other parent with compassion. For instance, you may worry that your soon-to-be-ex works too much or has too much going on in her or his life to take care of your children for several days in a row. Not raising your issues now could make it hard to change the child custody arrangement later.

Keep the focus on your children

Emotions often run high in contentious divorces. If you and your current spouse end your marriage on not-so-good terms, you may feel tempted to express your emotions in the parenting plan. This strategy could backfire, as children and their well-being must take priority in the plan. Even if you care little for your soon-to-be-former spouse right now, your child may still love and adore him or her.

Knowing where and how to focus your energy while drafting a parenting strategy may save you a lot of frustration and confusion. Throughout it all, think of the life you want your children to enjoy.