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Can nesting work for you?

As divorcing parents, you always want what is best for your child even in this difficult situation. This means setting them up with the tools they need to cope with these changes in their life.

One of the best ways you can do this is by ensuring they have the stability they need to build good coping mechanisms. Nesting is a great way to provide that stability.

How does it work?

Divorce Mag discusses the way nesting works for individuals. Nesting essentially allows your child to remain in the family home 24/7 instead of traveling between you and your ex-spouse’s house in accordance with a visitation schedule. Instead, you and your co-parent will take turns living in the family home with your child.

This reduces the stress that comes along with having to adapt to a new environment. Your child will not have to worry about their schedule getting interrupted or missing out on events because they will be with the other parent. They do not have to worry about getting used to a new home, making new friends or attending a new school.

Requirements for nesting

Of course, you and your co-parent must take efforts to ensure this works. It is up to you to cooperate well enough and trust one another to leave each other’s personal belongings alone while the other person is not around to guard them.

On top of that, you must have the means of having two separate living accommodations at once. Some parents will simply rent a small apartment, while others may spend their time in motels or with family or friends. But if you can make it work, it is a great opportunity for your child and something to consider.